Thursday, December 8, 2016

This Used To Be Somewhere (Revisited)


This video revisits a site I filmed in as a teenager. I made a short film there then to a song I've forgotten the name of, from an album I called "Songs For The Sea." The four track recordings to that album were left, and later lost in old bar in Cadiz, Spain. I have some tapes and half broken cd's but the original recordings are gone. I called back to Spain for them seven years later but they couldn't be located. If I transfer the remaining tape to digital someday I'll post the original song up here. That old film is long gone.

This music video was co-directed by myself and Trevor Nagle. With the intention of making a video for "This Used To Be Somewhere" I took some footage in the location on film. A week or so later myself and Trevor took a spin, hoping to get some footage of an old ruin for the vid, without me saying a word about the previous weeks location he took me right to the same spot as I had been the previous week! The video was shot up in a little abandoned cottage in the middle of the Gap Of Dunloe, Killarney, before you come to the Black Valley.

This Used To Be Somewhere is a song from the album "Where Splendour Falls" which is being released on digital download and vinyl. The digital download is available here. The vinyl is being printed at the moment and will be ready to ship by mid-January, if you want to reserve a copy of that send an e-mail to -

info@charlieobrien.net


Monday, December 5, 2016

Óglaigh Chill Airne

There was a book launch this evening in Gaelscoil Faithleann-an Irish speaking primary school in Killarney. The book "Óglaigh Chill Airne" by Tomás B O' Luanaigh concerns the setup of the Kerry branch of the Irish Volunteers, their involvement in the 1916 rising, and the subsequent interment of some of their members in the prison camp of Frongoch in Wales. Cheannaigh mé cóip, táimse ag tnú go mór leis an leabhair a léamh! 
the author himself an tAthair Tomás B O' Luanaigh

Just glancing through the book many gems appear, such as this short poem written by one of the internees at Frongoch, he recalls his participation in the rising in Dublin-

A thought immediately after surrender in Moore St.

Doomed to strive for all things 
to achieve none,
All attacking, nothing gaining,
Battles without fruit,
Laurels without triumph,
Fame without success.

signed, 
Denis Daly,
Main St. 
Cahersiveen

Frongoch Internment Camp, 
1st Nov. 1916

An Gal Gréine at Gaelscoil Faithleann

The book also tells how An Seabhac (the hawk) Pádraig Ó Siochfhradha on friday the 28th of November 1913 gave an Irish class as he usually did for Conradh na Gaeilge in Killarney. What made this class different was the enlistment of fifty members into the Irish Volunteers during the lessons. An Dún, where the meeting occurred, was an old disused Methodist Church that, incidentally, was situated right next to the apartment where I live here on High Street! This new branch of the volunteers was only the second in the country and many members went on to fight in the 1916 rising in Dublin.

New Street, Killarney, Irish Volunteers, 1914
In July 1914, the Oireachtas occurred in Killarney. It was on this November in Killarney too! 
During the 1914 festivities, 2500 members of the Irish Volunteers marched through the town with rifles and in full military regalia. The Royal Irish Constabulary who looked on were, needless to say, worried.